csgtitle (14K)
All images and original designs 2002 - 2017

hbar2a (7K)
hbar2a (7K)
I work in the copper foil method of stained glass. This allows for far more intricacy in a design than the lead came method. Here is one of my very favorite pieces: Leo the Lion. Keep reading to learn about the process that brought him to life! leo1 (65K)
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leopic (57K) Leo began as a photo I took some years ago at the National Zoo in Washington DC ( 2001)
hbar2a (7K)
After deciding on a subject to render in glass, the next step is creating the design. I took some artistic liberties with the design, such as not including the tree, and adding a tail. I also made the mane much more prominent, as it is the focus of the panel (I mean, really... All the Leo's "I" know have really big heads!) leoptn (2K)
hbar2a (7K)
wcwh2 (55K) Then the most fun: glass shopping. If you sew or knit, or do any sort of craft where there is a universe of options for materials, then you are very familiar with the sense of overwhelming inspiration one has while picking out supplies. Below is a mere corner of the warehouse at Warner-Crivellaro. WC is a very large stained glass supplier in Allentown, PA. They have an awesome website and online store, and their warehouse is open to the public, and I occasionally make a trek up there - with an empty trunk and a full wallet. Of course the trip home I have just the opposite :)
hbar2a (7K)
So, after the glass selection is agonized over and finally decided upon and purchased, we're ready to cut glass, right? Wrong. Before we can lay cutter to glass we have to prepare the pattern. Two copies of the pattern are printed. One on regular paper, the other on cardstock. The paper copy is affixed to the working surface, and the cardstock copy is cut up according to the pattern and the pieces are used as tracing templates for marking the glass. template (81K)
hbar2a (7K)
leowip1 (61K) NOW it's time to cut glass. Each pattern piece is traced and the glass scored with a glass cutter. Scoring affects the structural integrity of the glass, and it will tend to break along the score lines. I take great care in making sure the patterns in the glass work in harmony with the design, and normally I completely cut out the template pieces before cutting any glass, as generally, my designs have pretty strict coloring. Leo's mane, however, lent itself well to randomness. I had six or seven different shades of tan and brown glass, much of it scrap glass left over from other projects, and I intuitively selected colors as I fit the mane together.
hbar2a (7K)
Once all the pieces have been cut, the sharp edges are smoothed with a glass grinder, each piece is wrapped in copper foil tape, and fit together like a jigsaw puzzle. Just before soldering, flux is applied to the copper foil, The solder fills the minute gaps between each piece of glass, and holds all the pieces in place. leo_foiled (36K)
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leo1 (65K) Leo was "born" in June 2003. He is 23" x 16" and contains 116 pieces, with 75 in the mane alone.

Pattern Prep: 1 hr

Cutting & Grinding: 13.5 hrs

Foiling: 7 hrs

Soldering: 2.5 hrs

Framing and Cleaning: 3 hrs

Total: 27 hrs


hbar2a (7K)

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